Ambrotype- Françoisé Aimée Parent Roman

3/30/20 

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Ambrotype- Françoisé Aimée Parent Roman

 

O2012.002.002a

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Date

1831-1866
 
 

People

E. Jacobs, artist
Francoise Aimee Roman, subject
 
 

Geography 

New Orleans, Louisiana
 
 

Material/Technique 

Hand-tinted Ambrotype (glass plate); Brass; String
 
 

Dimensions 

15.6 x 12.1 x 1.9 cm
 
 

Credit

The Collection of Oak Alley Foundation

 

Marks 

Frame is embossed on the obverse with photographer’s name and location: “E. Jacobs | N.O”
 
 

Description

Francoisé Aimée Parent was born in New Orleans in 1797.  She married André Bienvenue Roman on July 200, 1816 in Saint James Parish, Louisiana in a duel wedding ceremony with her brother, Charles Parent who married André's sister, Edwige Roman.  Andre & Francoise had five children, three boys and two girls. 
In this photo, Aimée is photographed in her later years with her hair pulled loosely back and draped elegantly over her ears. She’s wearing a solid black gown that is belted at the waist and showcases large cuffed sleeves and embroidered details around the collar. Mrs. Roman is also seen wearing black gloves. Behind her is a plain white background. Despite her body being turned to a forty- five degree angle to the camera, her head openly faces forward allowing her to look directly back at her viewers. Through the use of hand-tinting, a bit of blush was added to her lips giving slight color to this otherwise black and white image. The ambrotype sits inside of a brass frame with an oval opening that has been edged with a embossed design. To the proper right side, beneath the above mentioned edging, the artist’s name and city have been etched. At a subsequent time period, string was tied around all four sides and corners of the frame in what appears to be an attempt at keeping the frame together, however, the frame shows no weaknesses.